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Presentation

2nd Revision

Introduction

 
Data - Population
Population and Land Area in China by Crop Value

Crop Value
Yuan/ha

Area
(sqkm)

Area
(% of Total)

Population
(millions)

Population
(% of Total)

Population
Density

missing

25,000

0.3

3

0.2

108

no crops

5,864,625

62.5

184

16.4

31

< 500

275,400

2.9

23

2.1

85

500-1000

390,525

4.2

32

2.8

81

1000-1500

416,650

4.4

47

4.1

112

1500-2000

426,325

4.5

66

5.9

155

2000-2500

325,900

3.5

79

7.1

244

2500-3000

289,700

3.1

89

7.9

307

3000-3500

304,600

3.2

110

9.8

360

3500-4000

213,050

2.3

90

8.0

423

4000-4500

183,375

2.0

82

7.3

446

4500-5000

168,700

1.8

76

6.8

452

5000-5500

151,925

1.6

69

6.1

453

5500-6000

119,675

1.3

54

4.8

455

> 6000

229,900

2.4

119

10.6

519

Source: IIASA LUC-GIS
In order to prevent misinterpretation, this table needs some explanation. We have here combined spatial population data of China with a map on average crop values (which you can also find in this application). Since crop values could be only calculated for those 5 x 5 km grid cells, in which the land-use map indicated crop cultivation (which is, for instance, not the case in steep mountains) quite a number of grid cells had zero value ("no crop"). However, the population within a county is distributed monotonously (because we have no information, how the population is distributed within the counties). The overlay of empty grid cells from the crop value maps ("no crop") with grid cells that are filled with population leads to the large percentage of population (63%), which lives in areas with "no crops". However, please be aware, that these people do not necessarily live far away from cropland. Quite frequently the cropland is just a 5 km grid cell away.
In other words: the table is calculated on the basis of those 5 km grid cells which have both crops and population. For instance, there are 119 million Chinese that live in crop areas (grid cells) where the crop value is more than 6000 Yuan per hectare. This is both "good" and "bad" news: It indicates that the most productive crop areas in China are those, where also many people live. It is good for these people that they have a relatively high income from their crops - however, it is bad news for the land, that so many people are crammed into these productive areas. In fact, the population density in these most productive areas the highest of all crop areas - some 519 people per square kilometer.
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Revision 2.0 (First revision published in 1999)  - Copyright 2011 by Gerhard K. Heilig. All rights reserved. (First revision: Copyright 1999 by IIASA.)